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About maHp

Involving a series of unique research and public engagement projects, the Migration and Health Project Southern Africa (maHp) aims to explore (and evaluate) ways to generate and communicate knowledge in order to improve responses to migration, health and well-being in the SADC region. Multiple disciplinary perspectives, mixed method approaches, and the involvement of various stakeholders – including migrants themselves – are central.

Latest News

Towards a framework for multisector and multilevel collaboration: case of HIV and AIDS governance in South Africa

Informed by the findings of the research on implementation of the multisectoral response to HIV in South Africa, and drawing from the existing literature; the authors propose a framework for multisector and multilevel collaboration.

Is it time to phase out UNDESA’s regional criterion of development?

This article shows that whether migrant stocks appear to be increasing or decreasing in developing countries depends on three factors: whether a regional or an economic criterion of “development” is used, whether volume is expressed in absolute numbers or as a percentage of total population, and whether the data include refugees and asylum seekers.

B Camminga talks transgender refugees in South Africa

“Transgender people often cannot afford the luxury of invisibility” – maHp/ACMS postdoctoral fellow B Camminga discusses their book ‘Transgender Refugees and the Imagined South Africa’ with Nal’ibali.

Sex Work, Migration, and Human Trafficking in South Africa: From polarised arguments to potential partnerships

This paper draws on research with sex workers and a sex worker organisation in South Africa, as well as reflections shared at two Sex Workers’ Anti-trafficking Research Symposiums. In so doing, the authors propose the further development of a Sex Work, Exploitation, and Migration/Mobility Model that takes into consideration the complexities of the quotidian experiences of migration and selling sex.

Decriminalising sex work is the only rational choice to end stigma, discrimination and violence against sex workers

Marcel van der Watt’s recent opinion piece on the effects of decriminalising sex work in South Africa makes such outlandish claims that it’s tempting to ignore him, if what he wrote wasn’t so disturbing and misrepresentative of the sex workers’ rights movement.

How not to draw a comic book about zama-zamas

maHp artist fellow Carlos Amato reflects on his positionality as a political cartoonist documenting the lived experiences of zama-zamas.

Explore maHp Research Projects

Sex work is work

Sex work – the consensual sale of sex between adults – is an important livelihood activity for some migrants in South Africa. In this research area, we explore intersections between sex work, migration, health and well-being.

Shifting Families

This project examines the intersection of migration and family using multi-sited case studies in Johannesburg (South Africa), Fes (Morocco), and Berlin (Germany). The main aim of this project is to interrogate the notions and dynamics of African migrant families in the context of contemporary and multi-directional migration flows in three urban spaces.

Mobility, deprivation and HIV risk

The overarching aim of this project is to conduct a large-scale study to inform the development of local level responses and programmes to address structural drivers of HIV targeting young people living in vulnerable urban environments as a key population in Malawi.

MoVE projects and public/private distinction

Visual researcher Quinten Williams blogs about the discussions held with MoVE participants regarding which of their images and stories could be shared with an audience outside the projects.

#artsmethods

#artsmethods provides spaces for dialogue between the multiple stakeholders involved in developing, undertaking and sharing visual, arts-based research projects.

Examining the use of participatory visual and narrative methods to explore the lived experience of migrants in Southern Africa

In this paper, we explore the opportunities – and challenges – associated with visual research methodologies.