Elsa Oliviera


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Elsa Oliveira is a researcher and PhD student at the African Centre for Migration and Society.

Since 2010, Elsa has been involved in a range of research projects that makes use of participatory visual and narrative methods. These projects aim to engage in research that explores the lived experiences of multiple migrant groups, with a specific focus on issues of sexuality and migration.

Elsa was one of two ACMS staff that launched the MoVE (methods.visual.explore) project. She is interested in exploring the ways in which research outputs can be disseminated into wider public forums and in the ways in which research can support social justice movements.

As part of maHp, Elsa will assist in coordinating visual research projects and undertaking research exploring visual methodologies for investigating migration and health in southern Africa.


Posts by Author

Making Research and Building Knowledge with Communities: Examining Three Participatory Visual and Narrative Projects with Migrants Who Sell Sex in South Africa

November 15, 2017 0 Comments and

In this chapter, maHp researchers Elsa Oliveira and Jo Vearey present and discuss three related participatory arts-based research projects conducted in partnership with Sisonke: the national sex worker movement in South Africa.

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Elsa Oliveira

Elsa Oliveira (current, since 2014, PhD in Migration & Displacement) PhD title: Sex work, migration and structural violence. Supervisors:  Jo Vearey and EJ Milne, University of Coventry & ACMS Research Associate

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Examining the use of participatory visual and narrative methods to explore the lived experience of migrants in Southern Africa

August 10, 2017 0 Comments and

In this paper, we explore the opportunities – and challenges – associated with visual research methodologies.

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Beyond the single story: creative research approaches with migrant sex workers in South Africa

This article shares insights into why we need to think differently about ways of doing research with marginalised migrant groups – including migrant sex workers in South Africa.

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Sex work is work

Sex work – the consensual sale of sex between adults – is an important livelihood activity for some migrants in South Africa. In this research area, we explore intersections between sex work, migration, health and well-being.

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Queer Crossings

December 2, 2016 0 Comments and

Oliveira, E., Meyers, S. and Vearey, J. (eds) (2016) Queer Crossings.  MoVE and ACMS: Johannesburg

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The Sex Worker Zine Project

December 2, 2016 0 Comments and

Oliveira, E. and Vearey, J. (eds) (2016) The Sex Worker Zine Project. MoVE and ACMS: Johannesburg

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Izwi Lethu

Schuler, G., Oliveira, E. and Vearey, J. (eds) (2016) Izwi Lethu. MoVE and ACMS: Johannesburg.

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‘Know me! But, remember that this is only part of who I am’: a participatory photo research project with migrant women sex workers in inner-city Johannesburg, South Africa

December 1, 2016 0 Comments and

Oliveira, E. and Vearey, J. (2016) ‘Know me! But, remember that this is only part of who I am’: a participatory photo research project with migrant women sex workers in inner-city Johannesburg, South Africa.  In: Arnold, M. and Meskimmon, M.  (eds) Homeland:  Migration, Women, Citizenship. Liverpool University Press: Liverpool

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Empowering, invasive or a little bit of both? A reflection on the use of visual and narrative methods in research with migrant sex workers in South Africa

November 10, 2016 0 Comments

In this article, the author presents and discusses three participatory visual and narrative research projects that have been conducted with migrant men, women and transgender persons who sell sex in two provinces of South Africa and examine the suitability of these approaches.

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I am more than just a sex worker but you have to also know that I sell sex and it’s okay: Lived Experiences of Migrant Sex Workers in Inner-City Johannesburg, South Africa

November 10, 2016 0 Comments

A perceived opportunity for improved livelihoods has made Johannesburg a target destination for many internal migrants moving within the borders of South Africa, as well as for cross-border migrants from around the continent and beyond.

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