Shifting Families

This project examines the intersection of migration and family using multi-sited case studies in Johannesburg (South Africa), Fes (Morocco), and Berlin (Germany). Drawing on an interdisciplinary approach from anthropology, education, gender, migration and linguistic studies, the main aim of this project is to interrogate the notions and dynamics of African migrant families in the context of contemporary and multi-directional migration flows in three urban spaces.

Shifting Families:  Interrogating notions of “family’ in a context of contemporary African migration and diverse urban spaces, using multi-sited case studies in South Africa, Morocco, and Germany

This project – funded by a Volkswagen Postdoctoral Fellowship – explores how African families renegotiate family systems and cope with structural, political and domestic violence throughout the migratory process. The project is based on an involved, mixed methodology consisting of analysis of census data, policy analysis and original empirical fieldwork in three countries.

Research partners
Prof. Fatima Sadiqui: Professor of Linguistics and Gender Studies, and Woodrow Wilson Center Fellow
Prof.  Moha  Ennaji: President, and Co-founder of the International Institute for Languages and Cultures (INLAC)
Dr. Lydia Potts: Lecturer at Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Coordinator of the Working Group Migration – Gender – Politics, and also Coordinator of the European Master in Migration and Intercultural Relations (EMMIR) MA course
Dr. Ulrile Lingen- Ali: Postdoctoral fellow based in the Department of Educational Sciences, and the Center for Migration, Education and Cultural Studies (CMC), at Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg
Magdalena Zimmermann: EMMIR MA student at Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg

About Zaheera Jinnah

Zaheera Jinnah has a PhD in anthropology and a background in development studies and social work. Her research interests are in labour migration, gender and diaspora studies. She is a researcher at the ACMS where she teaches, supervises graduate students, and engages in policy and academic research. Her doctoral thesis concentrated on aspects of gender norms, agency and livelihoods among Somali women in Johannesburg.

Share: