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About maHp

Involving a series of unique research and public engagement projects, the Migration and Health Project Southern Africa (maHp) aims to explore (and evaluate) ways to generate and communicate knowledge in order to improve responses to migration, health and well-being in the SADC region. Multiple disciplinary perspectives, mixed method approaches, and the involvement of various stakeholders – including migrants themselves – are central.

Latest News

Activism for Migrant Domestic Workers in South Africa: Tensions in the Framing of Labour Rights

In this article, maHp/ACMS postdoctoral researcher Kuda Vanyoro explores tensions in the ways in which non-governmental activism, as represented by trade unions and non-governmental organisations (NGOs), frames the concerns of migrant domestic workers (MDWs) living in South Africa.

WEBINAR INVITE: Present And Imminent: Crises And Complexity In Mexico And South Africa

maHp/ACMS director Professor Jo Vearey will be taking part in this South-South dialogue titled ‘Present and Imminent: Crises and Complexity in Mexico and South Africa’, organised by UNAM-Sudáfrica Centro de Estudios Mexicanos.

VIDEO: Building capacity for research on migration and health

maHp/ACMS director, Professor Jo Vearey recently presented at the 6th Global Symposium on Health Systems Research panel session on ‘Building capacity for research on migration and health: A call to action’. Watch her presentation here.

Refugees and migrants are vulnerable to ‘vaccine nationalism’ as host nations put their own citizens first

African Center for Migration and Society (ACMS) director, Professor Jo Vearey was recently quoted in this Thomson Reuters Foundation New’s article expressing her concern over possible “formal or de facto discrimination against undocumented migrants when it comes to vaccine access”.

VIDEO: Borders, mobilities and immobilities in southern Africa

maHp/ACMS doctoral researcher Kuda Vanyoro was recently part of the Migration Policy Centre webinar on ‘Borders, mobilities and immobilities in southern Africa’. Catch his presentation by watching the full webinar here.

OP-ED: Vaccine nationalism and migration: Implications for the (mis)management of Covid-19 in South Africa

As countries begin to roll out Covid-19 vaccination programmes, maHp/ACMS director Professor Jo Vearey argues there is no place for ‘vaccine nationalism’; that the principle of equity in global health access must be at the fore.

Explore maHp Research Projects

Telling the complex story of “medical xenophobia” in South Africa

maHp/ACMS doctoral researcher Kuda Vanyoro shares insights from his recent research on “medical xenophobia”, conducted in Musina. His study findings suggest that the experiences of non-nationals in South Africa’s public health care system are more complex and varied than implied by the dominant discourse on “medical xenophobia”.

MoVE projects and public/private distinction

Visual researcher Quinten Williams blogs about the discussions held with MoVE participants regarding which of their images and stories could be shared with an audience outside the projects.

Moving Words: Exploring mobility and urban inclusion through poetry based methods

Find out more about the Moving Words Project, which is a two-year collaboration between the University of the Witwatersrand and the University of Edinburgh.

Policy making in context

Very little is known about what drives policy making in South Africa. This project investigates the making and effects of policy around migration and health for migrant farm workers in Vhembe District, Limpopo.

Artisanal Small-Scale Mining & Well-Being

In this project we examine one form of informal work, small scale and artisanal mining and explore its connection to the urban economi(es), both formal and informal.

SeaM: Security at the Margins

Security at the Margins – SeaM – was a three-year partnership between the University of Edinburgh and the University of Witwatersrand. Our aim was to use innovative, interdisciplinary methods to explore (in)security on the urban margins in South Africa.  Our partnership was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the South Africa National Research Foundation (NRF).

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