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About maHp

Involving a series of unique research and public engagement projects, the Migration and Health Project Southern Africa (maHp) aims to explore (and evaluate) ways to generate and communicate knowledge in order to improve responses to migration, health and well-being in the SADC region. Multiple disciplinary perspectives, mixed method approaches, and the involvement of various stakeholders – including migrants themselves – are central.

Latest News

Building alliances for the global governance of migration and health

Health governance has an important role in dealing with global migration, argue maHp/ ACMS director Jo Vearey and colleagues.

PODCAST: 702’s ‘The Political Desk’ interview with Rebecca Walker

“To suggest that foreign nationals are grabbing jobs from South Africans is not supported by the research”, says maHp/ACMS postdoctoral fellow Rebecca Walker, during her recent interview with Talk Radio 702’s Bongani Bingwa, on ‘The Political Desk’ show, about xenophobia and migration in South Africa.

‘When they come, we don’t send them back’: counter-narratives of ‘medical xenophobia’ in South Africa’s public health care system

This article argues that there is more complexity, ambivalence, and a range of possible experiences of non-nationals in South Africa’s public health care system than the current extant literature on ‘medical xenophobia’ has suggested.

OP-ED: South Africa is burning: femicide, xenophobia and protests

Over the past few days South Africa’s major cities have burst into flames. This is not new. Co-ordinated and sporadic acts of violence linked to service delivery protests, xenophobic sentiments and public outrage are part of the DNA of post-apartheid South African politics.

Responding to the health needs of migrant farm workers in South Africa: Opportunities and challenges for sustainable community‐based responses

This paper highlights the ways in which local interventions that mobilise community members can improve the access that rural, migrant farming communities have to healthcare.

A week of migration & health in Joburg: Where are we? Where do we go?

Last week, the Lancet Commission on Migration and Health’s Report – The health of a world on the move– was formerly launched in South Africa at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits).

Explore maHp Research Projects

Shifting Families

This project examines the intersection of migration and family using multi-sited case studies in Johannesburg (South Africa), Fes (Morocco), and Berlin (Germany). The main aim of this project is to interrogate the notions and dynamics of African migrant families in the context of contemporary and multi-directional migration flows in three urban spaces.

Policy making in context

Very little is known about what drives policy making in South Africa. This project investigates the making and effects of policy around migration and health for migrant farm workers in Vhembe District, Limpopo.

Examining the use of participatory visual and narrative methods to explore the lived experience of migrants in Southern Africa

In this paper, we explore the opportunities – and challenges – associated with visual research methodologies.

Bua Modiri (2019)

Bua Modiri is Setswana for “speak out worker”. The name was chosen by a group of sex workers during a Sisonke meeting. Participants in this project were asked to focus on messages specific to their occupation.

Mwangaza Mama (2019)

Mwangaza Mama is a creative storytelling project that was undertaken in collaboration with a small group of cross-border migrant women living in Johannesburg. Inspired by previous MoVE work, the main aim of the two-year project was to learn more about migrant women’s everyday experiences of the city by including them in the production of knowledge about issues that affect them.

Mobility, deprivation and HIV risk

The overarching aim of this project is to conduct a large-scale study to inform the development of local level responses and programmes to address structural drivers of HIV targeting young people living in vulnerable urban environments as a key population in Malawi.