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About maHp

Involving a series of unique research and public engagement projects, the Migration and Health Project Southern Africa (maHp) aims to explore (and evaluate) ways to generate and communicate knowledge in order to improve responses to migration, health and well-being in the SADC region. Multiple disciplinary perspectives, mixed method approaches, and the involvement of various stakeholders – including migrants themselves – are central.

Latest News

PODCAST: Academic Digest: Exploring cross-border migration policies, ARV treatment continuity

Aldrin Sampear of PowerFM 98.7’s Power Talk/ Academic Digest show recently spoke to maHp/ACMS doctoral researcher Kudakwashe Vanyoro, whose MA study sought to understand the practices that frontline healthcare workers adopt to navigate a space of blurred policy, in relation to migration.

PODCAST: Migration in Africa

ACMS director Associate Professor Jo Vearey discusses migration in Africa on Channel Africa’s ‘African Dialogue’ show.

Telling the complex story of “medical xenophobia” in South Africa

maHp/ACMS doctoral researcher Kuda Vanyoro shares insights from his recent research on “medical xenophobia”, conducted in Musina. His study findings suggest that the experiences of non-nationals in South Africa’s public health care system are more complex and varied than implied by the dominant discourse on “medical xenophobia”.

The personal is political: a feminist reflection on a journey into participatory arts-based research with sex worker migrants in South Africa

maHp/ACMS postdoctoral researcher Elsa Oliveira offers a personal reflection of their journey into participatory arts-based research with sex work migrants in South Africa.

Some thoughts about the Bua Modiri workshop encounter

In this blog post, maHp/ACMS artist and visual researcher Quinten Williams reflects on the recent Bua Modiri workshop encounter through the notions of combinations, expanded knowledge practices, and place-making.

2x Post-doctoral Fellowships in Migration, Gender and Health Systems

maHp/ACMS is seeking to recruit two post-doctoral fellows to work on two research projects exploring migration, gender and health systems in South Africa. Applications close on 15th November 2019.

Explore maHp Research Projects

Shifting Families

This project examines the intersection of migration and family using multi-sited case studies in Johannesburg (South Africa), Fes (Morocco), and Berlin (Germany). The main aim of this project is to interrogate the notions and dynamics of African migrant families in the context of contemporary and multi-directional migration flows in three urban spaces.

SeaM: Security at the Margins

Security at the Margins – SeaM – is a three-year partnership between the University of Edinburgh and the University of Witwatersrand.  Our aim is to use innovative, interdisciplinary methods to explore (in)security on the urban margins in South Africa.  Our partnership is funded by the ESRC and NRF.

Mothering and Families

Under this project we take migration as a lens to explore the ways in which forms of vulnerability, as created and shaped by the urban spaces of the city, are encountered and negotiated in the everyday city lives of migrant women…

Examining the use of participatory visual and narrative methods to explore the lived experience of migrants in Southern Africa

In this paper, we explore the opportunities – and challenges – associated with visual research methodologies.

Mwangaza Mama (2019)

Mwangaza Mama is a creative storytelling project that was undertaken in collaboration with a small group of cross-border migrant women living in Johannesburg. Inspired by previous MoVE work, the main aim of the two-year project was to learn more about migrant women’s everyday experiences of the city by including them in the production of knowledge about issues that affect them.

Policy making in context

Very little is known about what drives policy making in South Africa. This project investigates the making and effects of policy around migration and health for migrant farm workers in Vhembe District, Limpopo.