Migration and Coronavirus in Southern Africa Coordination Group (MiCoSA)

Migration and Coronavirus in Southern Africa Coordination Group (MiCoSA)

As part of its response to the Covid-19 global pandemic maHp hosts weekly (Friday, 14:00 GMT +2) Migration and Coronavirus in Southern Africa Coordination Group (MiCoSA) webinars. These dialogues bring together national and SADC regional partners who are concerned with the health and well-being of asylum-seekers, refugees and migrants particularly during this coronavirus outbreak. This network includes academics, policy-makers, activists, NGOs, donors, migrants, etc. To be part of this network sign up here. While these webinars are held under Chatham House Rules this page will feature some of the discussion summaries.

MiCoSA updates

The City Otherwise: The deferred emergency of occupation of inner-city Johannesburg

This article draws on ethnographic fieldwork conducted in Johannesburg between 2011 and 2019 in inner-city unlawful occupations and temporary emergency accommodation sites. These are often referred to as “hijacked buildings”…

WEBINAR: Child trafficking in South Africa – exploring the myths and realities

The Centre for Child Law (CFCL) invites you to join the launch of the ‘Child Trafficking in South Africa: exploring the myths and realities’ report on Friday, 21 August 2020, 10:00-11:30 (SAST).

Migration and Covid-19: A review of South Africa’s policy response to the pandemic

This is the second in a series of issue briefs that explores the implications of Covid-19 and the South African response to the pandemic on migration and for migrant and mobile communities in South Africa.

Migration and Covid-19: Emerging concerns with South Africa’s response to the pandemic

This is the first in a series of issue briefs that explores the implications of Covid-19 and the South African response to the pandemic on migration and for migrant and mobile communities in South Africa. 

SeaM: Security at the Margins

Read and download for free the SeaM – Security at the Margins project e-book.

PODCAST: Why are migrants being excluded from SA’s response to Covid-19?

ACMS director Professor Jo Vearey chats to Radio 702’s Eusebius McKaiser. 

PODCAST: African Dialogue, Effects of Covid-19 on Migration

ACMS director, Associate Professor Jo Vearey discusses the effects of Covid-19 on migration, on Channel Africa.

The Migrant Nurse Dilemma (Creative Intervention)

In this article postdoctoral researcher Dudu Ndlovu offers a poetic transcription of an interview between a researcher and a migrant nurse.

Services for refugees and migrants in Covid-19 lockdown

Do you need legal or psycho-social assistance during the national Covid-19 lockdown and ongoing pandemic? See this infographic and list of services for refugees and migrants during the Covid-19 lockdown.

Migration Health Evidence Portal for COVID-19

The IOM Migration Health Research Portal has established an interactive, open-source, searchable, repository of research publications on COVID-19 in relation to migrants, migration, and human mobility.

Coronavirus: APO Group to support African governments in the fight against COVID-19

APO Group, the leading pan-African communications and business consultancy, recently announced they will support the dissemination of coronavirus-related information from African governments to the press and public.

VIDEO: Coronavirus amid a vulnerable populace

Last night (14 April 2020) ACMS Professor Jo Vearey was interviewed by Godfred Akoto Boafo of Citi TV’s current affairs show ‘Face to Face’, about the coronavirus pandemic and its impact on migrants.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: Full MA and PhD scholarships at ACMS

ACMS is seeking applications for full Masters and PhD scholarships offered by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) as part of its ‘In-Region Scholarship Programme South Africa’. Closing date: 05 May 2020.

Refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants in SA know your rights during Covid-19

LHR and CoRMSA recently tweeted an information sheet about the rights that refugees, asylum seekers and migrants in South Africa have during this Covid-19 national lockdown.

BLOG: An apple a day… The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the livelihoods of informal food traders – a case of Mangaung

ACMS Masters student Sinoyolo Godongwana blogs about the plight of informal food traders in Mangaung, amid this unfolding global pandemic – Covid-19.

Wits COVID-19 dashboard goes continental

Wits University’s COVID-19 dashboard has grown with new data features, including snapshot views of how the pandemic is spreading in Africa, as well as statistics showing world trends, being added.

Report Xenophobia in Times of COVID-19

Have you experienced any form of discrimination in relation to COVID-19 because of where you come from, your nationality and/or ethnicity? Then report your experiences to Xenowatch.

How is the Corona pandemic affecting the lives of refugees, asylum seekers, and migrants in South Africa and Canada? Two Protect researchers share their insights.

This is one of two blog posts where Protect researchers reflect upon how the Corona pandemic is affecting people on the move across the world. In this post, Professor Jo Vearey from Wits University and Professor Idil Atak from Ryerson University share their insights from South Africa and Canada.

COVID-19 Corona Virus South African Resource Portal

The South African government has set up an online resource portal to specifically share information about the Covid-19 / coronavirus pandemic, as it relates to the country.

Scalabrini Centre COVID-19 Information Sheets

The Scalabrini Centre of Cape Town, a non-governmental organisation that offers development and welfare programmes to the migrant and local communities of Cape Town, has recently produced information sheets about Covid-19 and the 21-day national lockdown regulations in multiple languages (namely Swahili, Shona, French, Lingala, Portuguese and English).

OP-ED: Covid-19 lockdown needs to protect inner-city communities

ACMS/maHp associate researcher Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon, and the general secretary of the Inner-City Federation Siyabonga Mahlangu argue that it is critical the police and army deployment for the Covid-19 lockdown not result in the persecution of residents of unlawful occupations.

OP-ED: Why xenophobia is bad for the health of all in South Africa

South Africa mustn’t forget the public — and that includes migrants and refugees — in its public health response to COVID-19, writes ACMS director, Associate Professor Jo Vearey.

A Creative Storytelling Project with Women Migrants in Johannesburg, South Africa (Dispatch)

In this dispatch ACMS/maHp postdoctoral researchers Rebecca Walker and Elsa Oliveira reflect on ‘Mwangaza Mama’, an arts-based storytelling project that they undertook in collaboration with a group of seven migrant women from across the African continent, who are now living in Johannesburg.

OP-ED: Border walls don’t stop viruses. But this might

Both the United States and South Africa have punted increased border security as a way to curb the coronavirus outbreak. Here’s why South Africa should be thinking less about walls and more about amnesty as cases mount.

As the middle-class posts lockdown selfies, how are the poor coping?

ACMS Masters student Shireen Mukadam speaks to the poor about the impact of the coronavirus and the national lockdown on their lives.

OP-ED: Foreign migrants must be included in Covid-19 response

International solidarity, travel restrictions and the right to remain: why South Africa needs to actively engage all foreign migrants in its response to Covid-19.

PODCAST: Winter is coming

ACMS director, Associate Professor Jo Vearey discusses South Africa’s responses to the Covid-19 pandemic on the ‘Monday Morning Meetings on Migration’ show.

OP-ED: Hypocrisy in the time of Covid-19

ACMS director, Associate Professor Jo Vearey explains how the sanctimony of moving from blaming foreign migrants to now rendering them invisible in a critical public health moment will have implications for our response to Covid-19.

VIDEO: Unfiltered: Coronavirus

ACMS Associate Professor Jo Vearey was recently part of an interview panel on the SABC News Unfiltered talk show that discussed migration and Covid-19 in South Africa.

‘It’s about being safe and free to be who you are’: Exploring the lived experiences of queer migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in South Africa

In this article, maHp/ACMS doctoral researcher John Marnell, Elsa Oliveira and Gabriel Hoosain Khan draw on participant-created visual and narrative artefacts to offer insights into the complex ways in which queer migrants, refugees and asylum seekers living in South Africa negotiate their identities, resist oppression and confront stereotypes.

PODCAST: Academic Digest: Exploring cross-border migration policies, ARV treatment continuity

Aldrin Sampear of PowerFM 98.7’s Power Talk/ Academic Digest show recently spoke to maHp/ACMS doctoral researcher Kudakwashe Vanyoro, whose MA study sought to understand the practices that frontline healthcare workers adopt to navigate a space of blurred policy, in relation to migration.

PODCAST: Migration in Africa

ACMS director Associate Professor Jo Vearey discusses migration in Africa on Channel Africa’s ‘African Dialogue’ show.

Telling the complex story of “medical xenophobia” in South Africa

maHp/ACMS doctoral researcher Kuda Vanyoro shares insights from his recent research on “medical xenophobia”, conducted in Musina. His study findings suggest that the experiences of non-nationals in South Africa’s public health care system are more complex and varied than implied by the dominant discourse on “medical xenophobia”.

The personal is political: a feminist reflection on a journey into participatory arts-based research with sex worker migrants in South Africa

maHp/ACMS postdoctoral researcher Elsa Oliveira offers a personal reflection of their journey into participatory arts-based research with sex work migrants in South Africa.

Some thoughts about the Bua Modiri workshop encounter

In this blog post, maHp/ACMS artist and visual researcher Quinten Williams reflects on the recent Bua Modiri workshop encounter through the notions of combinations, expanded knowledge practices, and place-making.

2x Post-doctoral Fellowships in Migration, Gender and Health Systems

maHp/ACMS is seeking to recruit two post-doctoral fellows to work on two research projects exploring migration, gender and health systems in South Africa. Applications close on 15th November 2019.

In sickness and in health: why the Minister of Home Affairs has a duty of care to tackle endemic anti-foreigner sentiment

Many of South Africa’s government officials have contracted a dangerous, highly contagious and apparently incurable disease. Symptoms include espousing anti-foreigner sentiments and scapegoating non-nationals for failures of the state, while simultaneously denying that xenophobia exists in the country.

Just Research? (Un)Seeing Politics in a Complex World

The third post of ‘The Disorder of Things’ blog symposium on Sophie Harman’s ‘Seeing Politics’ is by maHp/ACMS director Jo Vearey.

Migration and health in Southern Africa Regional Symposium

maHp/ACMS doctoral researcher Edward Govere reports on the Regional Symposium on Gender, Migration, Health and Public Policy & South African Launch of the UCL-Lancet Commission Report on Migration and Health.

Building alliances for the global governance of migration and health

Health governance has an important role in dealing with global migration, argue maHp/ ACMS director Jo Vearey and colleagues.

PODCAST: 702’s ‘The Political Desk’ interview with Rebecca Walker

“To suggest that foreign nationals are grabbing jobs from South Africans is not supported by the research”, says maHp/ACMS postdoctoral fellow Rebecca Walker, during her recent interview with Talk Radio 702’s Bongani Bingwa, on ‘The Political Desk’ show, about xenophobia and migration in South Africa.

‘When they come, we don’t send them back’: counter-narratives of ‘medical xenophobia’ in South Africa’s public health care system

This article argues that there is more complexity, ambivalence, and a range of possible experiences of non-nationals in South Africa’s public health care system than the current extant literature on ‘medical xenophobia’ has suggested.

OP-ED: South Africa is burning: femicide, xenophobia and protests

Over the past few days South Africa’s major cities have burst into flames. This is not new. Co-ordinated and sporadic acts of violence linked to service delivery protests, xenophobic sentiments and public outrage are part of the DNA of post-apartheid South African politics.

Responding to the health needs of migrant farm workers in South Africa: Opportunities and challenges for sustainable community‐based responses

This paper highlights the ways in which local interventions that mobilise community members can improve the access that rural, migrant farming communities have to healthcare.

A week of migration & health in Joburg: Where are we? Where do we go?

Last week, the Lancet Commission on Migration and Health’s Report – The health of a world on the move– was formerly launched in South Africa at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits).

Southern Africa needs better health care for women and girls on the move

Health responses need to take on board the fact that the number of women and girls migrating across borders as well as within countries is growing.

Challenges of the Migration and Integration of Ethiopian Entrepreneurs to South Africa

This ACMS policy brief gives an overview of a study undertaken under the auspices of the Migrating Out of Poverty Research Consortium (MOOP) at the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS), which explored the migration industry that attends the migration of Ethiopians to South Africa.

Woman is the thread: maHp intern covers the Mwangaza Mama book launch

maHp intern Elena Olivieri blogs about the launch of the Mwangaza Mama project book.

Bua Modiri (2019)

Bua Modiri is Setswana for “speak out worker”. The name was chosen by a group of sex workers during a Sisonke meeting. Participants in this project were asked to focus on messages specific to their occupation.

Me, them, us: Building belonging with young people on the move

maHp research associate Thea Shahrokh and civil society partners reflect on the recently held one-day symposium on ‘Building Belonging with Refugee and Migrant Young People’.

Inception meeting: Migration, gender and health system responses in South Africa – A focus on the movement of healthcare users and workers

MHADRI and maHp interns from the University of Edinburgh report on the inception meeting for the international grant-funded project “Migration, gender and health system responses in South Africa”.

Towards a framework for multisector and multilevel collaboration: case of HIV and AIDS governance in South Africa

Informed by the findings of the research on implementation of the multisectoral response to HIV in South Africa, and drawing from the existing literature; the authors propose a framework for multisector and multilevel collaboration.

Is it time to phase out UNDESA’s regional criterion of development?

This article shows that whether migrant stocks appear to be increasing or decreasing in developing countries depends on three factors: whether a regional or an economic criterion of “development” is used, whether volume is expressed in absolute numbers or as a percentage of total population, and whether the data include refugees and asylum seekers.

B Camminga talks transgender refugees in South Africa

“Transgender people often cannot afford the luxury of invisibility” – maHp/ACMS postdoctoral fellow B Camminga discusses their book ‘Transgender Refugees and the Imagined South Africa’ with Nal’ibali.

Sex Work, Migration, and Human Trafficking in South Africa: From polarised arguments to potential partnerships

This paper draws on research with sex workers and a sex worker organisation in South Africa, as well as reflections shared at two Sex Workers’ Anti-trafficking Research Symposiums. In so doing, the authors propose the further development of a Sex Work, Exploitation, and Migration/Mobility Model that takes into consideration the complexities of the quotidian experiences of migration and selling sex.

Decriminalising sex work is the only rational choice to end stigma, discrimination and violence against sex workers

Marcel van der Watt’s recent opinion piece on the effects of decriminalising sex work in South Africa makes such outlandish claims that it’s tempting to ignore him, if what he wrote wasn’t so disturbing and misrepresentative of the sex workers’ rights movement.

How not to draw a comic book about zama-zamas

maHp artist fellow Carlos Amato reflects on his positionality as a political cartoonist documenting the lived experiences of zama-zamas.

‘Skeptics’ and ‘believers’: anti-trafficking, sex work, and migrant rights activism in South Africa

Very little is known about activism, as it relates to the issue of migration in South Africa. This paper fills this gap by exploring multi-level policies and advocacy experiences of activists working on migration in a post-colonial context of South Africa through the lens of key contestations around the trafficking discourse in South Africa from 2005 to 2018.

Urban health in Africa: A critical global public health priority

This paper argues that a focus on urban health in Africa is urgently required in order to support progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and other global and regional public health targets, including Universal Health Coverage (UHC), the new Urban Agenda, and the African Union’s Agenda 2063.

SeaM Project Update

Security at the Margins (SeaM) is a three-year collaboration between the University of Edinburgh and African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS) that uses interdisciplinary research to understand (in)security in marginalised communities in urban South Africa.

Mwangaza Mama (2019)

Mwangaza Mama is a creative storytelling project that was undertaken in collaboration with a small group of cross-border migrant women living in Johannesburg. Inspired by previous MoVE work, the main aim of the two-year project was to learn more about migrant women’s everyday experiences of the city by including them in the production of knowledge about issues that affect them.

After the handover: Exploring MSF’s role in the provision of health care to migrant farm workers in Musina, South Africa

Using qualitative methodology and a case study approach, this paper traces the development of the Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) mobile clinic programme in Musina, exploring the changing relationship between MSF and the state.

Mwangaza Mama

Read and download for free the Mwangaza Mama project e-book.

THE MISSING: Zimbabwe – She’d Never Leave Her Son Behind

Our postdoctoral fellow Stanford Mahati is interviewed in this film documentary about a Zimbabwean woman Nomalanga Ndlovu, who went missing while traveling back to South Africa.

The globalisation of trafficking and its impact on the South African counter-trafficking legislation

In this article, the authors consider what influenced the development of South Africa’s 2013 Prevention and Combatting of Trafficking in Persons Act (TiP Act) as just one example of migration policy-making.

Sex work and condom use in Soweto, South Africa: a call for community-based interventions with clients

Despite public health interventions targeting sex workers in an attempt to increase condom use, HIV still remains a significant health issue for those involved in the sex industry in many countries. In this paper, the authors analyse data collected as part of an ethnographic study of sex work in Soweto, South Africa.

WAIT Midway Conference

Earlier this month (6th – 9th February) ACMS/maHp post-doctoral researcher B Camminga attended the WAIT project conference in Athens, and this is how the gathering unfolded.

Urban Health in Johannesburg: Migration, Exclusion and Inequality

In this issue, insights into how migration and mobility are mediating health within an African urban context are brought together.

Zimbabwean migrant domestic worker activism in South Africa

In this paper, maHp doctoral researcher Kuda Vanyoro, seeks to understand how Civil Society Organisations in South Africa facilitate the stay and protection of Zimbabwean migrant domestic workers (MDWs) through their activism.

CfP for 8th European Conference on African Studies (Edinburgh, 11-14 June 2019)

The call for papers for the 8th European Conference on African Studies (ECAS) themed ‘Africa: Connections and Disruptions’, is now open with the deadline for abstracts being Monday, 21 January 2019 (11pm CET).

[Meeting Report] Global Forum on Bioethics in Research – “Ethics of research with refugee and migrant populations, 2017”

The global Migration, Health, and Development Research Initiative (MHADRI) members participated in the Global Forum on Bioethics in Research satellite meeting in Bangkok, Thailand in November 2017, to explore the “Ethics of research with refugee and migrant populations”.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 17, 2018)

This issue brings us to the end of 2018 with a reflection on Sisonke’s 8th Annual National Meeting, and celebrates the movements resilience.

“We Fit in the Society by Force” Sex Work and Feminism in Africa

Drawing from two qualitative studies with two African sex worker groups in 2014 and 2015 — the South African movement of sex workers called Sisonke, and the African Sex Worker Alliance (ASWA) — this paper unpacks what it means to be an African sex worker feminist.

PODCAST: Vearey responds to Motsoaledi’s comment about ‘foreign nationals’ overcrowding SA’s health system

BBC World Service asks Associate Professor Jo Vearey to respond to Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi’s comment about ‘foreign nationals’ overcrowding SA’s public health system.

Transgender Refugees and the Imagined South Africa: Bodies over Borders and Borders over Bodies

This book tracks the conceptual journeying of the term ‘transgender’ from the Global North — where it originated — along with the physical embodied journeying of transgender asylum seekers from countries within Africa to South Africa and considers the interrelationships between the two.

SEMINAR: Protection of Asylum Seekers, Refugees in South Africa

Susan Tolmay of Amnesty International South Africa (AISA) gave a presentation about the main factors that make it difficult for asylum seekers to claim and receive refugee status in South Africa.

PODCAST: Are foreigners affecting our healthcare?

Associate Professor Jo Vearey of the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS, Wits University) discusses whether foreigners are really affecting South Africa’s public healthcare system on 702’s ‘The Best of Afternoon Drive with Joanne Joseph’. Listen to their interview below: About the Author Latest PostsAbout Jo VeareyJo Vearey is an Associate Professor with the African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand. She holds an Honorary Fellowship with the School of Social and Political Science at the University of Edinburgh, and a Senior Fellowship at

ACMS as a Centre of Excellence in Mobility and Migration

Fifteenth November 2018 saw the launch of the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS) as the African Research Universities Alliance (ARUA)’s Centre of Excellence in Mobility and Migration.

Multisectoral (in)action: towards effective mainstreaming of HIV in public sector departments in South Africa

The authors of this paper reflect on progress made in mainstreaming HIV in non-health sector departments, exploring factors that have enabled and hindered the process.

Interns identifying gaps in migration and health research

Exchange students Holly McCarthy and Pearl Agbenyezi blog about their internships with MHADRI and maHp.

PHOTOVOICE: ‘Un/Settled’

Photographer and maHp artist fellow Sydelle Willow Smith recently talked to MA student Esther V. Kraler about her project ‘Un/Settled’ and the importance of creating dialogue amongst South Africans regarding white privilege in a post-Apartheid, post-rainbow nation, post-TRC South Africa.

Preview ‘Izwi Lethu: Our Voice’ Issue 17

Izwi Lethu: Our Voice is a newsletter by sex workers for sex workers. Here you can read an excerpt of Issue 17 which will be published online soon.

PHOTOVOICE: ‘Trolley Pullers’ in Jo’burg

Street Photographer and maHp artist fellow Madoda Mkhobeni in conversation with MA student Esther V. Kraler about documenting the daily life struggles of ‘Trolley Pullers’ who reside in inner-city Johannesburg and Soweto.

Mapping Trends: Power imbalances and the circulation of information on sex work

maHp doctoral researcher Elsa Oliveira helps map the global and regional trends in information produced about sex work in an effort to shed light on these imbalances.

PODCAST: Informal miners’ experiences in Gauteng

Political cartoonist and maHp artist fellow Carlos Amato in conversation with MA student Esther V. Kraler about his upcoming graphic novella around informal migrant miners’ experiences in Gauteng.

How Unpopular Policies are Made: Examples from South Africa, Singapore and Bangladesh

In this article the authors contribute to the emerging knowledge on migration policy-making in two ways. Firstly, they address the relative lack of research on the gendered nature of migration policy-making. Secondly, they contribute to understanding migration policymaking in postcolonial contexts.

Securing Borders: The danger of blurring global migration governance and health security agendas in Southern Africa

This paper explores the potential risks associated with the blurring of global migration governance and health security agendas in Southern Africa, a region associated with high levels of population mobility, communicable, and – increasingly – non-communicable diseases.

Necessary Labour, Unwanted Humans: Migrant workers and Qatar’s FIFA World Cup

Some people are needed but undesirable. When ‘rich’ industrialised countries experience labour shortages, they turn to ‘poor’ developing countries and their people to fill these gaps. This is the premise of the documentary film The Workers Cup: Inside the Labor Camps of Qatar a Tournament for Workers.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 16, 2018)

In this issue, as with the previous ones, Izwi Lethu: Our Voice continues to advocate for the decriminalisation of sex work and educate not only Sisonke members but also other sex workers and the general public about the challenges encountered in the industry.

Screening of The Workers Cup film documentary

We invite you to the screening of the documentary The Workers Cup: Inside The Labor Camps of Qatar A Tournament for Workers, which will be followed by a discussion with one of the producers of the documentary Ramzy Haddad.

Carlos Amato

Carlos Amato is a political cartoonist. Carlos will produce a graphic novella – about 20 pages long – focused on the life of informal miners in Gauteng.

Cherae Halley

Cherae Halley is an Applied Theatre Practitioner and will be using an Applied Theatre methodology called Playback Theatre as a tool for research and to build community among migrants and nationals in Johannesburg.

Madoda Mkhobeni

Madoda Mkhobeni is a Street Photographer and for over a decade has been documenting the daily life struggles of people who reside in inner-city Johannesburg and Soweto.

Sydelle Willow Smith

Sydelle Willow Smith is a photographer/video director working across Africa focusing on memory, migration and identity.

Migration and health: a global public health research priority

Drawing on discussions with policy makers, research scholars, civil society, and United Nations agencies that attended the 2nd Global Consultation on Migration and Health – held in Colombo, Sri Lanka in February 2017 – the authors emphasize the urgent need for quality research on international and domestic (in-country) migration and health to support efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

‘If this isn’t for my children, who is it for?’ Exploring experiences of structural violence among migrant mothers who sell sex in Johannesburg

This article examines the vulnerabilities and forms of structural violence experienced by migrant mothers who sell sex.

Voetsek! screening sparks dialogue

In commemoration of World Refugee Day (20 June), ACMS screened Voetsek! Us, Brothers?, which was a documentary shot telling the in-depth stories of victims and perpetrators of xenophobic violence during 2008 and 2015 in South Africa.

“Gender Refugees” in South Africa: The “Common-Sense” Paradox, in: Africa Spectrum

This article is the runner up for the UFS/AS Young African Scholars Award. Join us in congratulating maHp/ ACMS postdoctoral researcher B Camminga for this great achievement, along with their recent selection as one of the Mail & Guardian 200 Young South Africans.

Impressions of China’s high octane urbanisation drive

maHp/ACMS postdoctoral researcher Khangelani Moyo chronicles his experiences and reflections of a recent study tour of three Chinese cities, namely, Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen.

B Camminga one of the M&G 200 Young South Africans

maHp’s postdoctoral fellow B Camminga has been selected as one of the Mail & Guardian 200 Young South Africans for 2018.

“Voetsek! Us, Brothers?” Screening

The Migration and Health Project (maHp) of the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS), at the University of the Witwatersrand invites you to the screening of Voetsek! Us, Brothers?

Container

Directed by Simon Wood and Meghna Singh, “Container” takes a hybrid approach to documenting the experiences of migrants risking everything in search of a better life, presenting their stories through a unique combination of virtual reality and installation art.

Oncemore Mbeve

Oncemore Mbeve holds a BA in Social Work and Masters of Arts in Psychology Research and Coursework and is currently enrolled for a PhD at the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS).

Labels, victims, and insecurity: an exploration of the lived realities of migrant women who sell sex in South Africa

Based on research work among cross-border migrant women who sell sex in South Africa, this paper examines the ways in which the label ‘victim’ of human trafficking ignores the complex realities of human mobility.

Connecting the Dots: Cultivating a Sustainable Interdisciplinary Discourse Around Migration, Urbanisation, and Health in Southern Africa

This chapter describes the authors’ experiences in connecting a group of emerging Southern African scholars around the inherently interdisciplinary field of migration, urbanisation and health.

“Container” carries migrants’ journey into virtual realm at IDFA

Directed by Simon Wood and Meghna Singh, “Container” takes a hybrid approach to documenting the experiences of migrants risking everything in search of a better life, presenting their stories through a unique combination of virtual reality and installation art.

Want to know more about migration?

What are the causes and consequences of migration and displacement? What methods of enquiry are appropriate for studying migration? Are migration and human mobility in Africa different from similar processes elsewhere?

‘We have the research but where is the influence?’ Constraints and opportunities for evidence-based policy impact in South Africa

This paper explores the research uptake and advocacy experiences of researchers and activists working on three unpopular and politically contentious causes; immigration, human trafficking and sex work – in a post-colonial context of South Africa.

[Re]-presenting knowledge: The coverage of xenophobia research in selected South African newspapers, 2008 -2013

This study explores the [re]-presentation of xenophobia research findings in two popular South African newspapers: the Mail & Guardian and the Sowetan from 2008 to 2013.

‘Youth On The Move: Reframing and representing youth migration’ conference

Youth migration is becoming an increasingly important phenomenon in transnational migration studies. However, when it is discussed there is a normative assumption that parental neglect is the cause. On April 13 an interdisciplinary conference – titled ‘Youth On The Move: Reframing and representing youth migration’ – sought to disrupt the adult bias in migration literature.

Richman Mutono

Richman Mutono current, since 2018,MA Migration & Displacement) MA Research report: Cross-Border movements : A source of transfer of diseases – A real challenge for the South African health care system. Supervisor: Jo Vearey

Sibonginkosi Dunjana

Sibonginkosi Dunjana (current, since 2018,MA Migration & Displacement). MA Research Report: An Assessment of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Migrant Women on Modern Contraceptives in a Foreign Country: The case of migrant women living in Johannesburg.

Sex work decrim discussions continue

The decriminalisation of sex work discussions continue in South Africa. One of these discussions was organised by the Gauteng Office of the Premier as a Roundtable on Decriminalisation of Sex Work, held on the 23rd of March 2018 at the University of the Witwatersrand’s Sports Hall.

How poetry can represent research

Today is World Poetry Day, and in South Africa, where I live and work it is Human Rights Day, a national public holiday commemorating the 1960 Sharpeville massacre. Is there way poetry and human rights can come together? And is there a way that poetry can be used as part of research on rights-based issues?

María-Teresa Gil-Bazo

Dr María-Teresa Gil-Bazo is a Senior Lecturer at the Newcastle University’s Law School, and an External Expert of the European Asylum Office (EASO). She qualified as a lawyer in 1993 and is a member of the Spanish Bar Council.

Repoliticizing international migration narratives? Critical reflections on the Civil Society Days of the Global Forum on Migration and Development

This paper draws on Pécoud’s international migration narratives (IMN) as an analytical framework to examine the Global Forum on Migration and Development’s Civil Society Days (GFMD-CSD).

8 projects to increase vital knowledge about women’s health

To mark International Women’s Day 2018, the Wellcome Trust Foundation highlights the Migration and Health Project Southern Africa (maHp) as one of the vital projects it funds to explore the health experiences of women from different backgrounds around the world.

Call for Artist Fellowships

maHp is looking to award up to five Artist Fellowships. The fellowships aim to support work that explores the role of art in promoting migration and health related research, and new knowledge uptake through public engagement. Closing date 31 March 2018.

“I’m not a feisty bitch, I’m a feminist!” Feminism in AWAKE! Women of Africa

Although being an African, a sex worker and a feminist are often considered to be incongruent identities, in certain embodiments they intersect and inform each other. This Profile highlights what feminism can learn from analysing sex workers’ rights activism among a group of Cape Town-based sex worker feminists called AWAKE! Women of Africa.

Call for Papers: Needs and Care Practices for Refugees and Migrants

In partnership with Ghent University’s Centre for the Social Study of Migration and Refugees (CESSMIR) maHp will be hosting this first annual conference on Needs and Care Practices for Refugees and Migrants in Belgium on 17-19 September.

Sex Workers Organising for Change: Self-representation, community mobilisation, and working conditions (SA chapter)

In the South Africa chapter of this Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW) report, maHp researcher and PhD candidate Ntokozo Yingwana documents how the Sex Workers Education and Advocacy Taskforce (SWEAT) and national sex worker movement Sisonke deal with human trafficking in the sex industry.

‘MoVE 2017: Two Arts-based Research Projects’ exhibition launch

VIDEO: On 21 November 2017 the ”Two Arts-based Research Projects’ exhibition was launched at the Workers’ Museum (Newtown).

Mwangaza Mama: meaning and moments

So after a discussion the women chose “Mwangaza Mama”. “Mwangaza”, a Swahili word that translates literally as “light”. However, the women also described it as meaning “joy”, “love” and “caring”. “Mama is a term of respect used for all women – with or without children” they told us.

40 000 words completed: My MA journey with maHp

My MA studies in Migration and Displacement came to a happy ending when I submitted my thesis in March 2017, after one good year of reading, writing and fieldwork.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 15, 2017)

This is the last issue of Izwi Lethu of 2017. Our reporters have worked hard throughout the year to bring you stories from meetings, creative spaces, and our community.

Call for applications: Part-time Research Assistant

The Migration and Health Project Southern Africa (maHp) is looking for research assistant to work on a public engagement project. This position would suit a doctoral student in their first year of registration working on migration and health. Closing date for receipt of applications is 5pm, Wednesday 31st January 2018.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 14, 2017)

It was just the month of the celebration of women in the world and roses are still all over! Our Izwi Lethu team has been hard at work to bring you this edition.

Psychosocial effects of forced migration

PODCAST: maHp/ ACMS Associate Professor Jo Vearey examines the effects of forced migration on people’s health and emotional well-being.

Tango with HIV

PODCAST: In commemoration of World AIDS Day (1 December), maHp/ ACMS post-doctoral researcher Dudu Ndlovu shares her poem on HIV/AIDS.

Celebrating sex workers’ stories at the Workers’ Museum

The Izwi Lethu team reflects on the recent launch of the MoVE: Methods: Visual: Explore exhibition at the Workers’ Museum.

Evaluation of the Option B+ PMTCT programme for HIV-positive mothers

maHp PhD candidate Melanie Bisnauth presented her research on the ‘Evaluation of the new Option B+ PMTCT programme for HIV infected women at hospital facilities’, at the AIDSImpact Conference, held earlier this month in Cape Town. These are the findings she builds on for her doctoral research.

Making Research and Building Knowledge with Communities: Examining Three Participatory Visual and Narrative Projects with Migrants Who Sell Sex in South Africa

In this chapter, maHp researchers Elsa Oliveira and Jo Vearey present and discuss three related participatory arts-based research projects conducted in partnership with Sisonke: the national sex worker movement in South Africa.

MoVE 2017: Two Arts-based Research Projects

The MoVE method:visual:explore project of the African Centre for Migration & Society (at Wits University) is holding an exhibition that showcases two visual and narrative research projects conducted in 2016 and 2017.

Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute

The Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute (Wits RHI) is a leading African research institute focusing on sexual and reproductive health, HIV and vaccine preventable diseases.

Sonke Gender Justice

Sonke Gender Justice is a nonpartisan, non-profit organisation, established in 2006 with a mission to create the change necessary for men, women, young people and children to enjoy equitable, healthy and happy relationships.

Solidarity Center

The Solidarity Center’s program in South Africa aims to improve the lives of working people, particularly the most vulnerable—farm workers, domestic workers, migrant workers and women workers—who face long-standing barriers to sharing the country’s economic prosperity.

Section 27

Section 27 is a public interest law centre that seeks to achieve substantive equality and social justice in South Africa.

Nazareth House

Nazareth House is a non-profit, charitable organisation, which has served the communities in South Africa for over 130 years. The Sisters of Nazareth have opened their doors to the poorest of the poor in caring for the sick, destitute, aged and under privileged, orphaned children.

Migrant Workers Union of South Africa

The Migrant Workers Union of South Africa (MIWUSA) is an advocacy group to help migrants in South Africa enjoy decent working conditions.

Lawyers for Human Rights

Lawyers for Human Rights (LHR) is an independent human rights organisation with a 38-year track record of human rights activism and public interest litigation in South Africa.

FACT-CHECKED: 2 claims about slavery & ‘child prostitutes’ in SA

maHp/ACMS postdoctoral research fellow Becky Walker was recently quoted in this Africa Check report, which investigated claims on “child prostitutes” in South Africa.

Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS)

The Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) is an international Catholic organisation with a mission to accompany, serve and advocate on behalf of refugees and other forcibly displaced persons.

International Organization for Migration (IOM)

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) is a dynamic and growing inter-governmental organisation, with 151 member states, committed to the principle that humane and orderly migration benefits migrants and society.

Consortium for Refugees and Migrants in South Africa (CoRMSA)

The Consortium for Refugees and Migrants in South Africa (CoRMSA), formerly known as the National Consortium for Refugee Affairs, is a registered non profit organisation tasked with promoting and protecting refugee and migrant rights.

Amnesty International South Africa (AISA)

Amnesty International South Africa, is the South Africa office of Amnesty International, the global movement of members, activists and supporters working together to fight and end injustices across the world and promote the realisation of human rights.

The burden of care

In a world and especially in a country where women’s bodies are systematically oppressed and violated – and where poor, black, foreign bodies are easily treated as disposable and unimportant – being a mother adds layers of fear, threat and physical and emotional burden.

African Centre for Migration & Society

The African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS) is an interdisciplinary African-based centre of excellence dedicated to shaping global discourse on human mobility and social transformation.

Abel Hospitality Ministries South Africa (AHOMSA)

AHOMSA is a team of Christian health professionals providing health care services, hunger prevention, drinking water provision and skills provision, as well as human resources capacity building to communities in Africa.

Sally-Jean Shackleton

Sally-Jean Shackleton is the Director of the Sex Workers Education and Advocacy Task force (SWEAT) in South Africa. She facilitates the efforts of over 90 strong staff members to address stigma, improve health programming, deliver direct service, improve visibility and voice, and advocate for the decriminalisation of sex work.

maHp on AMLive/SAfm “bad buildings” news insert

maHp associate Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon was recently interviewed for this AMLive/SAfm insert on “bad buildings” in Johannesburg, produced by Candice Nolan of SABCNews. [Permission to share this podcast was granted by the producer.]

Implementing a multi-sectoral response to HIV: a case study of AIDS councils in the Mpumalanga Province, South Africa

This paper assesses the implementation of a multi-sectoral response to HIV in South Africa, through a case study of the Mpumalanga Province.

Gender, violence, and sexuality: Collaborations for social justice at the intersection of academia, activism, and art

This blog post reflects on the “Gender, violence and sexuality: Collaborations for social justice at the intersection of academia, activism and art” symposium that took place earlier this year.

Melanie Bisnauth researches HIV/AIDS infected women in South Africa

maHp/ACMS PhD candidate Melanie Bisnauth is featured in Maastricht University’s latest Master of Science in Global Health newsletter as an alumna, discussing her current doctoral research on HIV/AIDS.

MoVE, participation, and partnerships

A consistent aspect of method:visual:explore projects (MoVE) has been the partnerships that create the conditions necessary for various projects to occur. Most MoVE projects usually occur in some partnership with a specialist social organisation, and sometimes, with another research body. This post takes stock of some of these connections.

“Being Seen”: Reflections on an arts-based research project with refugee women in Johannesburg

Postdoctoral fellow Becky Walker reflects on the “Life in the City” arts-based research project, which explores the experiences of women who are migrants and mothers living in inner-city Johannesburg.

Metropolitan Nomads: A Journey through Joburg’s Little Mogadishu

Read and download for free the Metropolitan Nomads: A Journey through Joburg’s Little Mogadishu project book.

300 000 Joburg housing backlog

Wilhelm-Solomon and Thabo Maisela, the mayor of Johannesburg’s special advisor for priority projects, held an in-depth discussion on the housing crisis in Johannesburg with 702’s radio talk show host Eusebius McKaiser.

Join the maHp team: 2x post-doctoral fellowships

Come join the Migration and Health Project Southern Africa (maHp) team! We are seeking to recruit two post-doctoral fellows.

Meaningful Engagement, Not Militarisation, Is The Way Forward for Mashaba’s Johannesburg

Anthropologist Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon shares his insights on Johannesburg mayor Herman Mashaba’s visits to so-called “hijacked buildings” in the city.

Fact sheet on migration and health in the South African context

In this fact sheet, members of the Migrant Health Forum (MHF) provide journalists and other interested parties with information about the number of non-nationals, unequal distribution, the healthy migrant effect, as well as the law on access to health care services.

Metropolitan nomads: a journey through Jo’burg’s “little Mogadishu”

This article takes an intimate look at the everyday life of Somali migrants in Johannesburg, where collective stories of migration and survival interweave with individual desires and hopes of seeking a better life outside a country shattered by decades of internal conflict.

Sex (work) and the City (tour)

maHp/ ACMS Masters student and intern Muluti Phiri blogs about the Asijiki Coalition AGM’s sex work city tour of Cape Town.

Accessing Health Care at Gauteng Hospitals and Clinics: I Know my Rights

What are my rights? How will I be classified? What can I do to ensure I get treatment? Drawing from South Africa’s Constitution, laws and policies pertaining to access to health care services, this fact sheet answers some of these questions.

Health care for migrants in South Africa

This flyer outlines the South African Constitution, Refugees Act and the National Health Act say about the health rights of migrants.

Miners’ health dominates Swazi migration dialogue

maHp/ ACMS researcher Zaheera Jinnah reports on the National Dialogue on Migration, which was recently held in Swaziland.

Routes, locations, and social imaginary: a comparative study of the on-going production of geographies in Somali forced migration

Drawing on the thresholds approach, a model that incorporates geography and mobility studies to understand migration from the perspective of migrants, this article examines the importance of location and route(s) in determining the journeys of Somali migrants.

Notes on Stitching our [HIV] Stories: Activist Quilts

Visual researcher Quinten Williams shares his notes and reflections on the Stitching our [HIV] Stories: Activist Quilts project’s origins, the workshop process, and the exhibition of the work.

Towards a migration-aware health system in South Africa: a strategic opportunity to address health inequity

This article provides an overview of the associations between migration and health in South Africa, and calls for the urgent development of ‘migration-aware’ health systems.

MoVE projects and public/private distinction

Visual researcher Quinten Williams blogs about the discussions held with MoVE participants regarding which of their images and stories could be shared with an audience outside the projects.

Elsa Oliveira

Elsa Oliveira (current, since 2014, PhD in Migration & Displacement) PhD title: Sex work, migration and structural violence. Supervisors:  Jo Vearey and EJ Milne, University of Coventry & ACMS Research Associate About the Author Latest PostsAbout Elsa OliveiraElsa Oliveira is a postdoctoral researcher at the African Centre for Migration and Society (ACMS), Wits University, where she is also the co-coordinator of the MoVE (methods:visual:explore) project. Since 2010, Elsa has been involved in a wide range of participatory arts-based projects with diverse migrant populations in rural and

Lynn Kumire

Lynn Kumire (current since 2017, MA by Research Report, in Migration and Displacement). Supervisor: Jo Vearey

Bothwell Vumai

Bothwell Vumai (current since 2017, MA by Research Report, in Migration and Displacement). Supervisor: Jo Vearey

Sex work and the law: Should SA decriminalise sex work?

maHp student interns Muluti Phiri and Erika Massoud reflect on the ‘Sex work and the law: Should SA decriminalise sex work?’ dialogue, which was recently hosted by the South African National AIDS Council (SANAC), and Mail & Guardian.

Examining the use of participatory visual and narrative methods to explore the lived experience of migrants in Southern Africa

In this paper, we explore the opportunities – and challenges – associated with visual research methodologies.

Negotiating the city: Exploring the intersecting vulnerabilities of non-national migrant mothers who sell sex in Johannesburg, South Africa

This article explores the intersecting vulnerabilities of non-national migrant mothers who sell sex in Johannesburg, South Africa – one of the most unequal cities in the world.

Before you judge me, KNOW MY STORY: review by Joy Watson

Nasty Women blogger Joy Watson reviews maHp’s KNOW MY STORY participatory arts-based research project.

Sex Worker Poster Project (2017)

The Sex Worker Poster Project took the multiple stories generated through the Sex Worker Zine Project as the starting point to create advocacy messages in the form of posters. The zine stories provided an entry point to guide the conceptualisation of advocacy messages related to aspects of participants’ lives. Posters, however, are very different communication mechanisms to zines. While zines offer page sequences through which nuanced messages can emerge in a relationship of image and text, posters need to be a bit more direct in getting their

A global research agenda on migration, mobility, and health

This paper by the Members of the Researchers on Migration, Mobility and Health Group explores the five core areas in which action is needed to support the development of a global research agenda on migration, mobility, and health.

Ntokozo Yingwana

Ntokozo Yingwana (current since 2017,PhD in Migration and Displacement)
Dissertation: Sex Work, Migration and Sexuality: how does migration influence sex workers’ sexuality?.
Supervisor: Ingrid Palmary

Semantics in migration policy making and why they (should) matter

Researcher Kuda Vanyoro blogs about the recent Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD), which was themed ‘Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration Now: Mechanics of a Compact Worth Agreeing to’.

Before you judge me, KNOW MY STORY! (public exhibition and discussion)

This exhibition showcases the pictures, collages and stories created during the KNOW MY STORY project; an arts-based research that explored the lives, struggles and reasons for selling sex. The event will include a discussion, dance performance, and role play.

A productive tension in the messages from Nelspruit and Makhado

Visual researcher Quinten Williams provides some thoughts on the partnership that underpins the research and social activism of the Sex Worker Poster Project.

A day to day account of a participatory arts-based workshop

This blog entry offers a facilitator’s glance into the day to day activities that comprise a participatory arts-based workshop conducted in partnership with a grassroots activist organisation.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 13, 2017)

The first edition of Izwi Lethu 2017 has landed in your hands. The reading and empowering of the mind has begun.

Lessons learned from a student field trip

maHp intern Edward Govere blogs about a recent field trip to Bushbuckridge and Musina. The objective of the trip was to expand the students’ knowledge of international migrant workers who live and work on farms, as well as some of the most remote rural areas in South Africa.

Edward Govere

Edward Govere is a PhD candidate in Migration and Displacement and a doctoral fellow at the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS). His research interests include migration and health; refugee studies; transnational migration; mental health; integration policies; public health; disability and governance of HIV/AIDS. His current research work focuses on how international migrants of African descent who reside in South Africa experience and negotiate othering practices in the context of South Africa’s public health system. Edward received his bachelor’s degree in Social Work from

Moffat Machiwenyika

Moffat Machiwenyika (current since 2017  MA in Migration and Dsiplacement) Research Report: Exploring governance of maternal health.. The case of migrant women living in Jeppestown, Johannesburg South Africa
Supervisor: Jo Vearey

Muluti Phiri

Muluti Phiri (current, since 2017, MA Migration and Displacement) MA Research Report: Factors influencing access to health-care services of female migrant sex workers in Rosettenville, Johannesburg. Supervisor: Jo Vearey

Thea Shahrokh

Thea Shahrokh is a doctoral researcher in the Migration, Displacement and Belonging group at the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, Coventry University, UK. Drawing on cases from Cape Town, her research is focused on questions of agency and belonging for young migrants living in complex urban contexts in South Africa.

KNOW MY STORY

Hushke, S. (ed) (2017) KNOW MY STORY MoVE and ACMS: Johannesburg

KNOW MY STORY (2017)

“Before you judge me, know my story!” The 14 sex workers involved in the KNOW MY STORY project took pictures, created collages, and wrote their stories, asking their audiences to listen to what they had to say about themselves, their lives, their struggles, and their reasons for selling sex. The project forms part of a larger ethnographic study on the experiences, health practices, and well-being of sex workers in Soweto, South Africa. Inspired by projects conducted by the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS)

Work and wellbeing on the urban periphery

The latest maHp research collaboration with Security at the Margins (SeaM) sought to understand the labour and health/wellbeing conditions that informal artisanal small-scale mining (ASM) communities on the periphery of Johannesburg reside in (download the full report here).

Gender, violence and sexuality: Collaborations for social justice at the intersection of academia, activism and art

We invite you to join us for a symposium featuring collaborative projects at the intersection of academia, activism and art. We will discuss three approaches to research and activism for social justice in the field of gender, violence and sexuality.

SeaM: Security at the Margins

Security at the Margins – SeaM – was a three-year partnership between the University of Edinburgh and the University of Witwatersrand. Our aim was to use innovative, interdisciplinary methods to explore (in)security on the urban margins in South Africa.  Our partnership was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the South Africa National Research Foundation (NRF).

Everyday Mayfair (2017)

Everyday Mayfair is a participatory research methods project in which Somali migrants explore, through the production of maps, photography and storytelling, their migration journeys from Somalia to Mayfair, Johannesburg, their present relationship with the city and their future hopes and dreams of resettlement in other parts of the world.

Metropolitan Nomads: A Journey through Joburg’s Little Mogadishu (2014)

This project takes a close look at the everyday life of Somali migrants in Johannesburg, where collective stories of migration and survival interweave with individual desires and hopes of
seeking a better life outside a country shattered by decades of internal conflict.

The bodies behind the ban

As we marked the first 100 days of a Trump presidency riddled by fear, fake news and chaos, it is worth reflecting on the bodies affected by some of the more harsh policies and rhetoric that have been unleashed by the new American president.

Illegal Immigrant

Postdoctoral researcher Duduzile Ndlovu blogs about presenting her PhD thesis back to the research participants she had worked with, using poetry.

Beyond the single story: creative research approaches with migrant sex workers in South Africa

This article shares insights into why we need to think differently about ways of doing research with marginalised migrant groups – including migrant sex workers in South Africa.

Chisomo Kalinga

Chisomo Kalinga is a Wellcome-funded literary post-doctoral researcher at the Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh. Her current project is titled “Tili Tonse (We are Listening): Mapping Oral Storytelling Traditions and Narratives with Health in Malawi”. Several of the research sites are located on the Mozambican, Tanzanian and Zambian borders to encourage a deeper understanding of African borderlands as a conceptual space and its impact on access to healthcare.

(Well)Being in the City: a focus on health and migration in Johannesburg

In this issue, insights into how migration and mobility are mediating health within an African urban context are brought together.The papers bring the voices of different urban migrant groups to the fore and provide fresh perspectives on approaches for exploring how to research and respond to migration, mobility, and urban health in southern Africa. Advocating for mixed method and multi-disciplinary approaches, the papers provide important contributions to multi-disciplinary thinking around complex social issues.

Giving Birth in a Foreign Land: Exploring the Maternal Healthcare Experiences of Zimbabwean Migrant Women Living in Johannesburg, South Africa

In order to inform future research, an exploratory study investigating the maternal healthcare and help-seeking experiences of migrant women living in inner-city Johannesburg was undertaken.

Poking the wound – research, stories and process – thinking through the complexities

maHp/ACMS postdoctoral researcher Becky Walker’s latest blog reflections on her current arts-based research project with migrant women/mothers from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Burundi who live in inner-city Johannesburg, and are seeking asylum. 

Colonialism and Medicine

Eusebius McKaiser of 702 fm interviewing UCT’s Dr Carla Tsampiras and Wits University’s Dr Matthew Wilhelm-Solomon on the fascinating/shocking global and local history of colonialism in relation to medicine: About the Author Latest PostsAbout Matthew Wilhelm-SolomonMatthew Wilhelm-Solomon is an Associate Researcher on the Migration and Health Project Southern Africa, based at the African Centre for Migration & Society at the University of Witwatersrand (Wits). Matthew holds a doctorate from the University of Oxford, which was ethnographic study of HIV/AIDS treatment programmes to displaced communities in

The Art of Science Communication

One of the key features of the broader maHp is to “explore (and evaluate) ways to generate and communicate knowledge”. In an effort to build skills within the team and start some of the conversations around how and why researchers should be engaged in research communication, three maHp researchers and PhD candidates signed up for the ‘Science Communication: trends, challenges and innovations’ online course.

Reflections on the “Analysing Patient Mobility, Migration and Health” workshop

maHp researcher Tackson Makandwa reflects on the “Analysing Patient Mobility, Migration and Health” workshop, recently co-hosted by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in collaboration with the University of York and the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS).

Asylum as a Form of Life: The Politics and Experience of Indeterminacy in South Africa

According to the United Nations, in 2003 South Africa had the highest number of asylum seekers worldwide. Based on interviews with applicants or former applicants to refugee status as well as officials, adjudicators and activists, the authors propose to analyze asylum as a form of life, rather than as bare life.

Melanie Bisnauth

Melanie Bisnauth is a PhD student at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa in the School of Public Health in collaboration with ACMS.

Urban Health in Johannesburg: Migration, Exclusion and Inequality

Cities of the global south—including Johannesburg—are associated with unplanned and unmanaged urban growth; poor urban governance (which is predominantly reactive rather than proactive); migration and mobility; and the resultant pressure on access to adequate services, including water, sanitation, housing, and healthcare.

Zille’s Tweets and History’s Miasma

Helen Zille, the former leader of South Africa’s opposition party, the Democratic Alliance (DA), and premier of the Western Cape, casually invoked, in a series of tweets, one of the continued liberal myths of colonisation – that Europeans brought advanced and widespread medical care to the colonies.

A Vibrant Civil Society, a Free Press, and an Independent Judiciary – last remaining bastions of democratic South Africa

The obligation to uphold the constitution and advance the realisation of rights for people living in South Africa has fallen on a combination of three pillars: the press, the courts and NGOs.

“Billions against migration” learn from South Africa

Listen to a podcast of ACMS /maHp researcher Zaheera Jinnah being interviewed by ARD.de on the lessons Germany and the European Union (EU) as a whole could learn from South Africa’s experience with migrants and refugees.

Workshop on “Analysing Patient Mobility, Migration and Health” (20-21 March 2017)

In collaboration with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the University of York, maHp will be co-hosting a workshop on “Analysing Patient Mobility, Migration and Health” next week.

Xenophobic Violence Reveals a Crisis in Policing and Leadership

The ongoing unrest and violence in South Africa’s urban areas and townships emphasises, once again, the breakdown in the rule of law. As has often been the case in post-apartheid South Africa, protests and community anger have been mobilised against the outsider, the black foreigner who is the target of wrath and fury. But this round of violence goes deeper, revealing fractures and issues of credibility in elected political leadership.

Routes and Rites to the City: Mobility, Diversity and Religious Space in Johannesburg

This project is exploration of the ways religion and diverse forms of mobility have shaped post-apartheid Johannesburg, South Africa. It analyses transnational and local migration in contemporary and historical perspective, along with movements of commodities, ideas, sounds and colours within the city.

‘If this isn’t for my children, who is it for?’ Exploring experiences of structural violence among migrant mothers who sell sex in Johannesburg

This paper examines the vulnerabilities and forms of structural violence experienced by migrant mothers who sell sex in Johannesburg. It argues that to develop a greater understanding of this group of migrant mothers there is a need to further explore the challenges that they face as well as the multiple roles negotiated in everyday life.

Janine White

Janine White is a lecturer in the Social Determinants of Health on the New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP) in the School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand.

Researching violence with children: experiences and lessons from the UK and South Africa

The impact of violence on children’s health and development has had growing attention in global and national politics. This article highlights key messages and learning points from the experiences of researchers who have worked with children and violence across the different contexts of the UK and South Africa.

Trump’s Muslim ban unfair and ineffective

President Trump’s order effectively shuts the door not just on migrants and refugees but on the very principles of justice, writes ACMS / maHp researcher Zaheera Jinnah.

Lorraine Nencel

Lorraine Nencel is an Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology, VU Amsterdam. She is specialised in qualitative methodology and her research focusses primarily on gender and sexuality.  Currently, Lorraine is a co-investigator on a project concerning the sexual and reproductive health of young female migrants (sex workers, ready made garment workers, and beauty parlour workers) in Dhaka Bangladesh.  Lorraine also writes on epistemological issues and researchers’ engagement in relation to feminist and critical research.

Treasa Galvin

Treasa Galvin has a background and training in Social Anthropology and Sociology. Before moving to the University of Botswana, where she is currently a senior lecturer, Dr. Galvin lectured at Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland and the University of Zimbabwe.  Her research interests lie in the areas of migration and refugee movements, ethnic relations and kinship and family structures.

Dabea Gaboutloeloe

Dabea Gaboutloeloe is the National Migration Health Coordinator for the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in South Africa, and has served in IOM Migration Health Programs since 2006. 

Nuala McGrath

Nuala McGrath is Professor of Epidemiology and Sexual Health; Wellcome Trust Career Development Fellow within Medicine at the University of Southampton.

In the Shadow of a State: Self-Settlement Strategies and Informal Governance Amongst Somalis in Johannesburg

This article explores the role of informal governance and institutions in the self-settlement strategies of Somalis in South Africa.

Kol Wickramage

Kol Wickramage is the International Organization for Migration (IOM) Global Migration Health Research and Epidemiology Coordinator, and has served in IOM Migration Health Programs since 2009.  Kol has worked on a broad spectrum of health programs ranging from medical interventions for ex-combatants following civil conflict, to migration health policy formulation, epidemiological research surveys, Yellow fever/MERS/Ebola virus outbreaks and post-crisis interventions in mass displacement contexts.

Lenore Manderson

Lenore Manderson is Distinguished Professor of Public Health and Medical Anthropology in the School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa, and Visiting Distinguished Professor of Anthropology in the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, Brown University, Providence RI, USA. She has undertaken research extensively with immigrant and refugee populations, and with Indigenous and Anglo-Australians, in Australia.

Mark Collinson

Mark A. Collinson is a Senior Researcher at the MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, University of Witwatersrand.  Mark was co-instrumental in establishing the MRC/Wits Agincourt Health and Demographic Surveillance System in South Africa in 1992, and has led the INDEPTH Network Migration, Urbanisation and Health Working Group since 2003.

Christine Jacobsen

Christine M. Jacobsen is a Professor of Social Anthropology working mainly in the fields of Gender Studies and International Migration and Ethnic Relations. She is currently director of Centre for Women’s and Gender research at the University of Bergen, Norway.

Reading the Zine Image

The zines from the Sex Worker Zine Project are powerful visual and narrative accounts of personal struggles and successes, everyday realities, beliefs, hopes and dreams. These visual stories are crafted around aspects of participants’ lives that they wanted a public to know about.

Do You Hear Them Cry South Africa?

Today is the ‘International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers’. Participants of The Sex Worker Zine Project have been adding their voices to the #Decrim Blog Carnival. This project challenged stereotypes of migrant sex workers, calling for a move away from a single, rehearsed story. Here is Kagee‘s introduction to his zine, followed by its link.

Don’t Judge Me Just Because I Am A Sex Worker!

In commemoration of tomorrow’s ‘International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers’ (17 December) the maHp is taking part in the #Decrim Blog Carnival. Below is Doe-Doe’s introduction to her zine, which was produced as part of The Sex Worker Zine Project. This project challenged stereotypes of migrant sex workers, calling for a move away from a single, rehearsed story.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 12, 2016)

Thanks once more for making time to choose to read Izwi Lethu! 2016 has been a great year this far as we about to welcome 2017.

Carren Ginsburg

Carren Ginsburg is employed as a Researcher in migration and health through the MRC/Wits Rural Public Health and Health Transitions Research Unit (Agincourt), School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand (Wits). She has a background in research relating to geographic mobility, health, education and youth in the South African and African context, which has been developed both through her studies and through her work experience, including time with the well-known Birth-to-Twenty study.

Moeketsi Modisenyane

Moeketsi Modisenyane is the Director: International Health Relations and Support at the National Department of Health, South Africa.  Moeketsi is currently working with various academic institutes, civil society, regional and international organisations and partners in securing the right to health for migrants in the South Africa and the SADC regional. About the Author Latest PostsAbout Jo VeareyJo Vearey is an Associate Professor with the African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand. She holds an Honorary Fellowship with the School of Social and

Marlise Richter

Marlise Richter is the head of Sonke Gender Justice’s Policy, Development and Advocacy Unit. She oversees Sonke’s projects on prison reform advocacy, the decriminalisation of sex work, advocacy efforts towards a National Strategic Plan on Gender Based Violence, and the Sonke-UCLA Health and Human Rights LLM fellowship programme. She serves on the steering committees of the Asijiki Coalition for the Decriminalisation of Sex work as well as the Hate Crimes Working Group.

Anuj Kapilashrami

Anuj Kapilashrami is a Lecturer in Global Health Policy at the University of Edinburgh.  Anuj is the Programme Director for the MSc in Global Health & Public Policy, and Associate Director of the Global Development Academy at the University of Edinburgh.

Jo Hunter-Adams

Jo Hunter-Adams is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Health Economics Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town. Jo is a qualitative public health researcher with an interest in the intersections between migration, food and health.

Lorena Muñoz

Lorena Muñoz is an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota. Lorena is an urban/cultural geographer whose research focuses on the intersections of place, space, gender, sexuality, health and race.  Her research includes exploring the experiences of urban migrant and immigrant labourers in the Global South.

What could go wrong in this year’s GFMD?

By KUDAKWASHE VANYORO and KELLYNN WEE The 2016 Global Forum on Migration and Development just opened in Bangladesh. Two return delegates from civil society explain what would make this year’s conference, in their eyes, better than the last. About the Author Latest PostsAbout Kuda VanyoroKuda is a Research Communications Officer and Doctoral Researcher at ACMS. In 2013, Kuda was awarded an International Human Rights Exchange Programme special scholarship from Bard College and the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. There he acquired distinguished multidisciplinary human rights

LeConté Dill

LeConté Dill is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences at the SUNY Downstate School of Public Health in Brooklyn, NY and a Research Associate with the African Centre for Migration & Society at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Maternal and Child Health

This research project focuses on the nexus between migration and urban health in the context of urban inequality, health inequity, xenophobia and anti-foreigner sentiments in South Africa and Johannesburg in particular.

Jasmine Gideon

Jasmine Gideon is a Senior Lecturer in Development Studies with a specific focus on the gendered political economy of health in Latin America. She has a PhD and an MSc in Development Studies and a BA (Hons) in History.  Jasmine’s research focuses on gender and health, globalization and development, and transnational migration and health

Felicity Thomas

Felicity Thomas is a Research Fellow on the Cultural Contexts of Health, and a Senior Research Fellow in the Medical School at the University of Exeter.  Felicity’s work has focused on the health and well-being of low-income communities, migrants and families with complex needs; sexual health and HIV; environment-related health inequities; and the promotion of healthy schools.

Sarah Willen

Sarah S. Willen is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Connecticut and Director of HRI’s Research Program on Global Health and Human Rights. A medical and sociocultural anthropologist, her primary research interests include the illegalization and criminalization of migrants; immigration and health; health and human rights; embodiment and experience; and anthropological approaches to morality, dignity, and deservingness.

EJ Milne

EJ Milne is a Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations at Coventry University.  Her research focuses on the process, politics and ethics of knowledge production with particular regard to people in transition and / or affected by conflict. This includes people identifying as LGBTQI, migrants and refugees and young people.  

Verina Wild

Verina Wild is a Post Doc researcher at the philosophy department at the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich. Her main research interests are clinical ethics, public health ethics and global health justice, with a special focus on migrant health. She is a physician by training and has worked in bioethics and public health ethics since 2008.

Svati Shah

Svati Shah is an Associate Professor in Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University ofMassachusetts, Amherst.  Her research includes work on migration, sexuality and sex work.

Johanna Hanefeld

Johanna Hanefeld is an Associate Professor in Health Policy and Systems’ Research at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM).  Johanna’s research includes a focus on medical travel and migration.

Lorena Nunez

Lorena Nunez is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of the Witwatersrand.  She is a Social Anthropologist with a specialisation in Medical Anthropology, and works on linkages between migration, HIV, mental health and faith-based healing.

Laura Bisaillon

Laura Bisaillon is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto.  She is an interdisciplinary social scientist whose research program is substantively organised at the intersections of the politics of health and illness, socio-legal studies, and immigration studies.

Searching for HIV Harmony in SADC

Panashe is a twenty-six-year-old Zimbabwean women living with HIV. She works in a restaurant in the old mining town of Roodepoort on the west rand of Johannesburg.

Health systems and migration

South Africa, like the rest of the Southern African Development Community, has a high prevalence of communicable diseases, an increasing non-communicable disease burden, and diverse internal and cross-border population movements.  However, migration-aware responses are currently lacking.  This research explores the ways in which migration and mobility affect health systems, and suggests ways to improve responses to the movement of people.   About the Author Latest PostsAbout Becky WalkerBecky Walker is a postdoctoral research fellow with the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS). With a background

Participation in scientific committees

maHp team members participate as international experts in scientific and technical advisory committees relating to migration and health.

Conferences and symposiums

maHp team members regularly participate in national, regional and international research conferences and symposia.

Public exhibitions

With the MoVE method:visual:explore project, maHp hosts public exhibitions and engagement events that provide a range of publics with the opportunity to engage with the lived experiences of diverse migrant groups in southern Africa.

Policy dialogues

In partnership with the Johannesburg Migrant Health Forum, maHp is hosting a series of policy dialogues on issues relating to migration, health, policy and practice.

Policy making in context

Very little is known about what drives policy making in South Africa. This project investigates the making and effects of policy around migration and health for migrant farm workers in Vhembe District, Limpopo.

HIV, mobility and migration

In this research project, the role of contemporary population mobility in mediating the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan African (SSA) is explored and recommendations for action to assist in strengthening responses to HIV – including the call for migration-aware programming – in the region will be made.

Sex work is work

Sex work – the consensual sale of sex between adults – is an important livelihood activity for some migrants in South Africa. In this research area, we explore intersections between sex work, migration, health and well-being.

Shifting Families

This project examines the intersection of migration and family using multi-sited case studies in Johannesburg (South Africa), Fes (Morocco), and Berlin (Germany). The main aim of this project is to interrogate the notions and dynamics of African migrant families in the context of contemporary and multi-directional migration flows in three urban spaces.

Independent Migrant Children

This qualitative study seeks to understand the different experiences and perspectives of migrant children who migrated to South Africa with regards to how they negotiate with different discourses of femininity and masculinity…

#artsmethods

#artsmethods provides spaces for dialogue between the multiple stakeholders involved in developing, undertaking and sharing visual, arts-based research projects.

Learnmore Mvundura

Learnmore Mvundura (current, since 2016, MA(research) in Migration & Displacement) Dissertation: Interests, Ideas, and the Workspace: towards understanding local level sexual and reproductive health (SRH) interventions targeting migrants in Kutama-Sinthumule, Limpopo South Africa
Supervisor: Jo Vearey

Pinky Mahlangu

Pinky Mahlangu (current, since 2011 – PhD, Public Health) PhD title: A multi- level and multi-sectoral governance response to health and development challenges: a case of HIV and AIDS in urban informal settlements. Supervisors: Jo Vearey, ACMS and Dr. Liz Thomas, University of Fort Hare

Janet Munakamwe

Janet Munakamwe (current, Migration & Displacement) PhD title: Emerging political subjectivities in a post migrant labour regime: Mobilisation, participation and representation of foreign workers in South Africa (1980-2013).

Theresa Sommers

Theresa Sommers (current, since 2014, PhD in Global Governance and Human Security, University of Massachusetts, Boston) PhD title: Experiencing Migration: Understanding the Health and Well Being of Youth Migrants in South Africa. ACMS Committee member:  Jo Vearey About the Author Latest PostsAbout Theresa SommersTheresa Sommers is a PhD candidate in Global Governance and Human Security, with a focus on Global Health, at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, and is a visiting student at the ACMS, WITS. She holds a BA in International Relations (Wellesley College,

Greta Schuler

Greta Schuler (current, since 2014, PhD in Creative Writing) PhD title: Tricky Business Supervisors:  Jo Vearey and Bronwyn Law-Viljoen, Creative Writing About the Author Latest PostsAbout Greta SchulerGreta Schuler is a PhD candidate in creative writing and a doctoral fellow at the African Centre for Migration and Society (ACMS). Her dissertation focuses on the lives of migrant sex workers in Johannesburg.With ACMS’s MoVE project, Greta is facilitating creative writing workshops with sex workers and running the Gauteng sex worker newsletter, Izwi Lethu: Our Voice. Greta’s

Tackson Makandwa

Tackson Makandwa (current, since 2014, PhD in Migration & Displacement) PhD title: Migration, gender and access to health: Exploring maternal healthcare experiences among migrant Zimbabwean women in Johannesburg South Africa. Supervisor: Jo Vearey About the Author Latest PostsAbout Tackson MakandwaTackson Makandwa is a maHp researcher and PhD candidate at the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS). He has worked as an assistant lecturer in the Department of Psychology at the Great Zimbabwe University, and as a processing officer in the Ministry of Home Affairs

Kuda Vanyoro

Kuda Vanyoro  (current, since 2015, PhD in Migration & Displacement)PhD in Migration & Displacement) PhD tittle: Liminal space, temporal disruptions: Exploring the social regulation of (im) mobile Zimbabwean migrants in Musina, South Africa Supervisor: Jo Vearey About the Author Latest PostsAbout Kuda VanyoroKuda is a Research Communications Officer and Doctoral Researcher at ACMS. In 2013, Kuda was awarded an International Human Rights Exchange Programme special scholarship from Bard College and the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. There he acquired distinguished multidisciplinary human rights education and

Thea de Gruchy

Thea de Gruchy (current, since 2016, PhD in Migration & Displacement) PhD title: Exploring the creation of policy in South Africa: migrant labour and agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa. Supervisors: Jo Vearey and Anuj Kapilashrami, University of Edinburgh

Exploring The Migration Profiles of Primary Healthcare Users in South Africa

South Africa’s public healthcare system responses seldom engage with migration. This exploratory study investigates migration profiles and experiences of primary healthcare (PHC) users.

Queer Crossings

Oliveira, E., Meyers, S. and Vearey, J. (eds) (2016) Queer Crossings.  MoVE and ACMS: Johannesburg About the Author Latest PostsAbout Elsa OliveiraElsa Oliveira is a postdoctoral researcher at the African Centre for Migration and Society (ACMS), Wits University, where she is also the co-coordinator of the MoVE (methods:visual:explore) project. Since 2010, Elsa has been involved in a wide range of participatory arts-based projects with diverse migrant populations in rural and urban areas of South Africa. She has a PhD in Migration and Displacement and is

The Sex Worker Zine Project

Oliveira, E. and Vearey, J. (eds) (2016) The Sex Worker Zine Project. MoVE and ACMS: Johannesburg About the Author Latest PostsAbout Elsa OliveiraElsa Oliveira is a postdoctoral researcher at the African Centre for Migration and Society (ACMS), Wits University, where she is also the co-coordinator of the MoVE (methods:visual:explore) project. Since 2010, Elsa has been involved in a wide range of participatory arts-based projects with diverse migrant populations in rural and urban areas of South Africa. She has a PhD in Migration and Displacement and

Izwi Lethu

Schuler, G., Oliveira, E. and Vearey, J. (eds) (2016) Izwi Lethu. MoVE and ACMS: Johannesburg. About the Author Latest PostsAbout Greta SchulerGreta Schuler is a PhD candidate in creative writing and a doctoral fellow at the African Centre for Migration and Society (ACMS). Her dissertation focuses on the lives of migrant sex workers in Johannesburg.With ACMS’s MoVE project, Greta is facilitating creative writing workshops with sex workers and running the Gauteng sex worker newsletter, Izwi Lethu: Our Voice. Greta’s short stories and essays have appeared

Migration and sex work in South Africa: key concerns for gender and health

Richter, M. and Vearey, J.  (2016) Migration and sex work in South Africa:  key concerns for gender and health.  In: Gideon, J. (ed) Gender and Health Handbook. Edward Elgar Publishing: UK About the Author Latest PostsAbout Jo VeareyJo Vearey is an Associate Professor with the African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand. She holds an Honorary Fellowship with the School of Social and Political Science at the University of Edinburgh, and a Senior Fellowship at the Centre for Peace, Development and Democracy

‘Know me! But, remember that this is only part of who I am’: a participatory photo research project with migrant women sex workers in inner-city Johannesburg, South Africa

Oliveira, E. and Vearey, J. (2016) ‘Know me! But, remember that this is only part of who I am’: a participatory photo research project with migrant women sex workers in inner-city Johannesburg, South Africa.  In: Arnold, M. and Meskimmon, M.  (eds) Homeland:  Migration, Women, Citizenship. Liverpool University Press: Liverpool About the Author Latest PostsAbout Elsa OliveiraElsa Oliveira is a postdoctoral researcher at the African Centre for Migration and Society (ACMS), Wits University, where she is also the co-coordinator of the MoVE (methods:visual:explore) project. Since 2010,

Mobility, migration and generalised HIV epidemics: a focus on sub-Saharan Africa

Vearey, J. (2016) Mobility, migration and generalised HIV epidemics: a focus on sub-Saharan Africa. In: Thomas, F. (ed) Handbook of Migration and Health. Edward Elgar Publishing: UK About the Author Latest PostsAbout Jo VeareyJo Vearey is an Associate Professor with the African Centre for Migration & Society, University of the Witwatersrand. She holds an Honorary Fellowship with the School of Social and Political Science at the University of Edinburgh, and a Senior Fellowship at the Centre for Peace, Development and Democracy at the University of

Love and Truth in Arts-based Research

The #artsmethods 3 Symposium held at the 10th to 11th November in the Worker’s Museum, Newtown mined the unstable territory of images and ‘collaborative arts’, and the conditions of their creation.

The Future of Artisanal Mining is Clouded in Dust and Smoke

The future of artisanal small-scale (ASM) mining in South Africa rests on a legal and existential precipice; its very definition is clouded in dust and smoke.

Crossing the Borders of Humanitarianism: Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in Inner-City Johannesburg

This paper is an account of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) Brussel’s projects in Johannesburg from 2007 to 2013, drawing on the ethnographic research of an external researcher (Wilhelm-Solomon) and MSF health worker and project leader (Pedersen).

Decoding dispossession: Eviction and urban regeneration in Johannesburg’s dark buildings

In January 2012 the residents of an inner-city tenement building in Doornfontein, Johannesburg, were evicted on a court order. This paper documents how a group of blind Zimbabweans experienced threats of violence and accusations of betrayal, as they were offered alternate accommodation by the evicting company because of their disability.

Understanding healthcare and population mobility in southern Africa: The case of South Africa

Migration provides opportunities for health and economic benefits, and has the potential to positively and negatively affect health systems. This paper outlines the authors’ current research and existing responses to migration and health in southern Africa.

Selling Sex, Mothering and “Keeping Well” in the City: Reflecting on the Everyday Experiences of Cross-Border Migrant Women Who Sell Sex in Johannesburg

Drawing from interviews with non-national or cross-border migrant women who sell sex on a regular basis, this paper explores experiences of selling sex, motherhood and ‘keeping well’ through the lens of the city.

Arts based research, expressive forms and uncertainty

As Barone and Eisner argue, the expressive form, and the ability to work with uncertainty, are two important characteristics of arts based research.

Zama Zamas: Women of Stone

“Grinding stones is like grinding peanut butter,” one of the women working on an illegal “crushing” site near Johannesburg explained recently, “but on stones you use your whole power.”

The Double Stigma of Migration and Sex Work

“From a migrant’s perspective from another country you face a double stigma as sex workers first because you are from another country, second because you are a sex worker in a country where sex work is criminalised” said Lindah

Research ethics in practice: lessons from studies exploring interpersonal violence in different contexts

Studies researching interpersonal violence (IPV) are associated with a range of ethical challenges. In this article, lessons are drawn from three case studies exploring the experiences of different groups of survivors and perpetrators…

“At Your Own Risk”: Narratives of Migrant Sex Workers in Johannesburg

Existing evidence indicates that cross-border migrant women sex workers in South Africa are often marginalized by state and non-state actors professing to assist them. Trafficking discourses frequently conflate migrant sex workers with…

Sex work and South Africa’s health system: Addressing the needs of the underserved

Sex work remains illegal and highly stigmatised in South Africa, resulting in sex workers – the majority of whom are internal or cross-border migrants – experiencing ongoing human rights violations and a high HIV burden.

Empowering, invasive or a little bit of both? A reflection on the use of visual and narrative methods in research with migrant sex workers in South Africa

In this article, the author presents and discusses three participatory visual and narrative research projects that have been conducted with migrant men, women and transgender persons who sell sex in two provinces of South Africa and examine the suitability of these approaches.

I am more than just a sex worker but you have to also know that I sell sex and it’s okay: Lived Experiences of Migrant Sex Workers in Inner-City Johannesburg, South Africa

A perceived opportunity for improved livelihoods has made Johannesburg a target destination for many internal migrants moving within the borders of South Africa, as well as for cross-border migrants from around the continent and beyond.

Cultural Causations and Expressions of Distress: a Caste Study of Buufis Amongst Somalis in Johannesburg

Buufis is a well-known concept among Somalis at home and in the diaspora, although its meaning shifts across time and space. Literally meaning ‘to blow, or inflate’ in Somali, buufis initially referred to the dream of resettlement among Somalis in refugee camps in Kenya in the early 1990s…

Son of the Soil… Daughters of the Land

South Africa’s Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Freedom Charter are globally ground-breaking for providing provisions of non-discrimination, and, of particular note, on the basis of sexual orientation.

MoVE

MoVE focuses on the development of visual and other involved methodologies to research the lived experiences of migrants in southern Africa.

Stitching our [HIV] Stories (2016)

Stitching our [HIV] Stories – activist quilts by members of Sisonke, the South African national sex worker movement.

Sex Worker Zine Project (2015)

Zines were produced by 24 men, women, and transgender persons who live and sell sex in the Gauteng, Limpopo, and Mpumalanga provinces of South Africa.

Izwi Lethu (2015 – ongoing)

Izwi Lethu – Our Voice – is newsletter produced by sex workers living and working in the Gauteng Province of South Africa.

Queer Crossings (2014)

Queer Crossings is a multimodal visual arts, narrative and poetry writing project conducted with lesbian, gay and bisexual asylum seekers and migrants.

Equal Airtime (2014)

Equal Airtime is a culmination of visual and narrative work produced by twenty migrant sex workers during two, three-day workshops. The workshops were held in Musina and Makhado – two small towns in the Limpopo Province, South Africa.

Volume 44 (2014)

Volume 44 is a participatory photography project with migrant sex workers in Musina (Limpopo Province) and Johannesburg (Gauteng Province).

Working the City (2010)

Working the City was a ten-day participatory photo project with eleven migrant women who live and sell sex in Hillbrow, an inner-city suburb of Johannesburg, located in the Gauteng Province, South Africa.

Artisanal and Small-scale Mining Workshop (10 Nov. 2016)

This workshop aims to bring together key stakeholders and provide an open platform for engagements and discussions, to effectively shape the ASM research agenda in South Africa.

Policy Dialogue on Migration, Sex Work and Health (9 Nov. 2016)

This dialogue brings together stakeholders working on the above issues in order to work towards a collective research and advocacy agenda for 2017.

Stitching our [HIV] Stories: activist quilts exhibition

Made collectively by members of the Sisonke National Sex Worker Movement, these powerful quilts chart a twenty-year struggle against healthcare discrimination, police harassment and community stigma.

On crises and commonality: reflections from an international symposium on migration and intersectionality

On 28 October 2016, maHp team members, Thea de Gruchy, Zaheera Jinnah, and Goitse Manthata, participated in an international symposium titled ‘Intersectionality and Migration’ at Carleton University.

Arts Methods Symposium and Exhibition (10-11 Nov. 2016)

This is the third in a series of linked events exploring different arts-based approaches to research and activism.

Migration and Intersectionality Symposium (28 Oct. 2016)

maHp researcher Dr Zaheera Jinnah and doctoral candidates Thea De Gruchy and Goitseone Manthata are participating in the forthcoming international public symposium taking place in Ottawa, Canada on intersectionality and migration.

Proud in Europe? LGBTI refugees, immigration authorities & the gay community in the EU

Last month Amsterdam was home to the Europride, a European LGBT event which takes place in a different European city every year.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 11, 2016)

Finally the long awaited 21st International AIDS Conference was successfully held for the second time in history and for a whole week in Durban, South Africa.

Artivism: art as activism, activism as art

Art can be a powerful tool for activists. It can grapple with the world and bring about change. This piece explores some of the artivism on display at AWID 2016.

Policy Dialogue on Migration, Mobility and the UNAIDS 90:90:90 Targets in Southern Africa (19 Aug. 2016)

The relationship between population mobility, migration and HIV is one that is both complex and contested. In line with renewed calls for a focus on the structural drivers of HIV, how can responses to HIV engage with migration?

Limpopo Crossings

Limpopo Crossings is a research project centred around a series of trips taken by doctoral researcher, Greta Schuler, with migrant sex workers from South Africa to Zimbabwe.

Visualising Migration at Sea

This arts-based research project aims to throw light on the world of oceanic mobilities and subaltern populations who get contained in states of suspension or drown in order to find a better life.

Mothering and Families

Under this project we take migration as a lens to explore the ways in which forms of vulnerability, as created and shaped by the urban spaces of the city, are encountered and negotiated in the everyday city lives of migrant women…

Young People, Migration & Health

This project engages with and explores the heterogeneous experiences of young migrants in order to understand how migration affects their lives, including overall health and well-being, belonging, gender, representation, and livelihoods.

Mobility, deprivation and HIV risk

The overarching aim of this project is to conduct a large-scale study to inform the development of local level responses and programmes to address structural drivers of HIV targeting young people living in vulnerable urban environments as a key population in Malawi.

Artisanal Small-Scale Mining & Well-Being

In this project we examine one form of informal work, small scale and artisanal mining and explore its connection to the urban economi(es), both formal and informal.

Migration-aware HIV responses in southern Africa

maHp Project Manager Jo Vearey discusses what the International AIDS Conference’s call for ‘Access Equity Rights Now’ mean for migration-aware HIV responses in sub-Saharan Africa on an Ubuntu radio interview (26th July 2016).

Why migration patterns are so important to designing responses to HIV

Significant strides have been made in the global response to HIV. But there is an urgent need to rethink the ways that prevention and treatment programmes are developed and implemented.

Research, arts and advocacy: launch of Izwi Lethu project book

‘Izwi Lethu: a participatory arts-based project’ book was launched at the Sex Workers Education and Advocacy Taskforce (SWEAT) and Sisonke office in Johannesburg last week.

Research, arts and advocacy: launch of Izwi Lethu project book

‘Izwi Lethu: a participatory arts-based project’ book was launched at the Sex Workers Education and Advocacy Taskforce (SWEAT) and Sisonke office in Johannesburg last week.

Between a rock and a hard place: Informal artisanal gold mining in Johannesburg

On the western periphery of Johannesburg, with the famous skyline of the city silhouetted in the early morning sun, Bongani is beginning another day of work.

[Re]-presenting knowledge: Critical reflections on the coverage of xenophobia research in the South African media, 2008 to 2013

This presentation was made at the 23rd Annual South African Sociological Association (SASA) Conference at Rhodes University on 28 June, 2016. maHp researcher Kuda Vanyoro argues that there is a tendency by South African newspapers to merely report ‘using’ findings, and not ‘on’ them.

Exploring the Intersectionalities of Gender and Sexuality in Migration Studies

“Could you tell me what the difference is between a sex worker and someone who sells sex?” asks a member of the audience. “Well, we argue that some of these migrant women do not necessarily label themselves as a sex worker.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 10, 2016)

This is the first issue for the year 2016. And you are only getting to taste the goodness that we have been preparing for you over the past six months now.

The Struggle Against Silence: Media Responses to Decriminalising Sex Work in South Africa and Zimbabwe

In March this year, Cyril Ramaphosa – the South African Deputy President – publicly indicated support for the decriminalisation of sex work when launching the first South African National Sex Worker HIV Plan.

Op-ed: Sex workers essential to meeting new HIV targets

South Africa has committed itself to reaching the world’s latest batch of ambitious targets, but it will not meet them without sex workers.

Sex work, migration and HIV: South Africa’s health system can – and should – take a lead

Last week saw the launch of the South African Health Review (SAHR) 2016 edition at the Health Systems Trust Conference in Johannesburg.

The Limpopo River and the Mediterranean Sea: Asylum Seeking and Migration Policing in South Africa and Europe

How is policing and securitising of refugee and migration policy in both South Africa and Europe creating new social divides and exclusions and exacerbating insecurity?

Izwi Lethu (Issue 9, 2015)

We have come to the end of 2015 and have had a wonderful time. There have been exciting activities throughout the year. These include the SAYAS Symposium, WOTRO workshop, ASIJIKI Launch, among others.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 8, 2015)

As we draw close to the end of the year there is a series of exciting events lined up. These include Sixteen Days of Activism Against Women and Children Abuse, World AIDS Day, International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers, and many more!

Izwi Lethu (Issue 7, 2015)

Warm greetings from the sunshine of Limpopo! Eleven participants from the 2014 MoVE project Volume 44 were reunited once more in Musina from the 24th to the 27th of August.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 6, 2015)

Spring is here and summer is around the corner! It’s now time to dress down and stay refreshed with Izwi Lethu: Our Voice.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 5, 2015)

It is with much sadness to learn that there isn’t just harassment of sex workers by members of the South African Police Services (SAPS) but unnecessary brutality.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 4, 2015)

In this edition, we present you with a bigger than usual rendition of your beloved Izwi Lethu: Our Voice.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 3, 2015)

The spirit of openness has seen a lot of nations succeed! Singing with one voice as a multitude has enabled others from far off places to hear the song sung from beyond their borders.

Izwi Lethu (Issue 2, 2015)

Sisonke Sex Workers Movement and the African Centre for Migration & Society would like to express our sincere gratitude to you all who have received the first issue of our newsletter positively and gave encouraging feedback

Izwi Lethu (Issue 1, 2015)

Sisonke Sex Workers’ Movement Gauteng, in conjunction with the African Centre for Migration & Society (ACMS), with the support of the Open Society Foundation (OSF), is proud to render a first of its kind newsletter, Izwi Lethu: Our Voice, by sex workers!

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